Yes, I Do Have an Opinion about HR 4038

According the the UNHCR, the refugee agency of the United Nations, there were 4 million, 289 thousand, 792 refugees from Syria spread out among 5 neighboring nations, all of those nations, with the exception of Jordan perhaps, having had recent issues with war and violence themselves. Hence 800,000+ have attempted to cross the Mediterranean Sea to Europe, in addition to trying other routes, routes that have been gradually cut off as European nations feel the strain experienced by Middle Eastern countries as they attempt to meet the needs of a desperate, homeless, frightened group of people.

The borders are porous, which at the moment serves ISIL well, because an easy to penetrate border allows them to continue to fund their caliphate through the sale of contraband, oil, and through cash fundraising. It also allows them to spread their hatred to other countries. It is not hard to imagine, therefore, an ISIL operative entering the ranks of the refugees, just as it is also easy to imagine an intelligence operative entering the ranks of recruits.

The plight of 4 million people is hard to ignore. Taking 10,000 (.25%) of those people does not seem like too much to ask, yet our country is like the urban homeowner responding to homelessness. You want to allow homeless people to stay in your home, you know that the majority of people are law abiding, decent people, but it only takes one to steal from you or knife you in your sleep. However, most of us don’t spend 2 years vetting every potential resident in our homes. The U.S. does.

Evidently, it is difficult to obtain good information from Syria these days. The Washington Post reports that FBI Director James Comey testified before Congress last month that  “Although…the process has since ‘improved dramatically,’ Syrian refugees will be even harder to check because, unlike in Iraq, U.S. soldiers have not been on the ground collecting information on the local population. ‘If we don’t know much about somebody, there won’t be anything in our data,’ he said. ‘I can’t sit here and offer anybody an absolute assurance that there’s no risk associated with this.'”

FBI Director James Comey in 2013

FBI Director James Comey in 2013

So the motivation behind the House Republican sponsored H.R. 4038 appears to be, on the surface, the safety of the American people. Just an additional layer of security. It is so deceptively reasonable that 47 House Democrats voted in favor of it. All Congress asks is that the FBI director and the director of Homeland Security personally certify  that a “covered alien” (that is, a refugee from Syria or Iraq) does not pose a threat to the United States, and reports monthly to 12 Congressional committees. It bumps the background check process to the highest level of government. But they assure us that it will have no appreciable impact on our refugee program, except to make it safer.

I find it terribly disingenuous for the party of no gun control to be suddenly so concerned for the safety of the American people.

The sincerity test would be to apply the wording of H.R.4038 to gun control. What if everyone who bought a gun had to be certified as no threat to the American people by the director of the FBI? No one waits two years in this country to purchase a gun, and to have the highest police officer in the land certify you as safe? The idea is laughable; of course that would bring gun sales to a virtual halt and the politicians advocating for such a change would find themselves on the NRA’s blacklist. The slaughter of innocent Americans is a “tragic but acceptable risk” for the sake of 2nd Amendment freedom, but no risk is acceptable for the sake of compassion.

Once James Comey made the statement that it would be impossible to know everyone’s story for sure, Republicans found the perfect way to impede the progress of compassion under Obama’s plan; there is no way Comey can sign off after saying what he’s said without some major change to the program. And, predictably, Comey has balked at this legislation. Who knows how long it could take, and whether it can be done without sending foot soldiers to Syria, against Obama’s better judgement.

Even during the Cold War we could not certify that there were not spies among the defectors that eventually made it to the United States. The fact is that no one, not anyone can guarantee that anyone else, stranger or neighbor, is perfectly safe. To expect that sort of guarantee before you offer safe haven to the refugee is ludicrous. Surely there are better ideas out there?

Meanwhile, millions of refugees are crowding into nations that can barely hold their own in the international community, and ISIL is using the internet to recruit disaffected youth from all parts of the world. In fact, Comey testified in writing in October “It is no longer necessary to get a terrorist operative into the United States to recruit.” ISIL wants to take us from within, using terrorists sprouted out of our own soil and nourished from afar by their propaganda. This was the case in Paris, in Nigeria, in Mali. H.R. 4038 is a smokescreen, a diversion that hands ISIL exactly what it wants.

A nation willing to risk the lives of its young men and women in a ground war overseas can surely risk its own comfort and convenience to care for its victims.

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Yes, I Do Have an Opinion about HR 4038

    • I saw that post. I worked in human services for many years, and I find it amazing that she worked 22 months and only just now encountered an instance of ingratitude. It is par for the course when you are in a helping profession, working with people who are traumatized, who really just want their homes back, who really just want their old lives back. Sometimes it only comes out when they are in a safe place. I’m not saying that’s what it was, but I would not be at all surprised.

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